Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
CSPAN 14
CSPAN2 8
MSNBCW 4
CNNW 3
FBC 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 49
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
mcfarland, and author of the knewly released book, "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy," thank you, both, for being here. >> thank you. >> thank you. lou: kt, starting withyou, the idea that the president wants to return, the administration wants to return to a democratically elected president, which is precisely what the egyptian people have demonstrated they want no more of after a year, think you would know more. >> well, those are not the actions anymore. the actions is can the military establish some kind of order because the option is not military against democracy. it's the military maybe gets a little bit of order going, or you have chaos and potentially another civil war. i thought, by the way, the introduction was great. you set up the fact that we were for the mubarak government before we were against them, and then we were for the morsi government before we against it, and for the military government before we were against it now. lou: thank you, and te with the -- the "we" referred there is a reference to the obama admistration. eric, in the book, you call
of severe penalties over steroid use. is it enough to restore trust in america's favorite pastime? perspective this morning as i talk with bob costas of nbc sportses. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday morning, august 4th. >> and good sunday morning. the u.s. is on high alert at this hour. 22 u.s. embassies from north africa to bangladesh are closed now, and a worldwide travel alert is in effect for americans. andrea mitchell is nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent. andrea, good to have you here. what is it about where this is coming from and the significance of it that has engendered such a big reaction? >> well, they have intercepted chatter and it's coming from and targeting yemen. they believe it's either emanating from yemen where al qaeda and the arabian peninsula is the strongest unit or fractional unit of al qaeda that still remains. it's also the most operational unit. they're concerned about this area, but now they're looking at other areas as well. if there is no attack today, because this is the holiest day of the month of ramadan, t
in america for five years so that if we're going to target one particular person we're ready to jump on it? that is being discussed and debated. the president is open to suggestions to make this stronger and more responsive and transparent. >> what's your suggestion? because the nsa argues you can't have half a haystack opinion you have to have basically all the numbers in the united states if you're going to be able to match it against what senator chambliss talked about, a bad guy overseas talking to somebody in the united states. >> that's one of two questions. first is how much do you need to collect? who should hold this? does the government need all this information on everybody in this country? that's the first preliminary question that we're going the address. the ekd second is the fisa court, this court we know very little about and isn't public, how much authority should it have? what checks should be in place to make sure that there is at least an adversary yal proceeding there when it comes to the issue of privacy and security? so i think that we're open to changes in both. the
with paula broadwell, he is reinventing himself in america's media capital, taking a teaching gig. >> life doesn't stop with such a mistake and can and must go on. >> reporter: petraeus joins a long line of officials who were involved in scandals. public reasonings expert has covered everyone to -- take immediate responsibility. apologize to the right people, his wife and the american people. and remove yourself from controversy, meaning don't fight to stay on as cia director. it didn't hurt that the president granted petraeus a graceful exit. >> he has provided this country an extraordinary service. >> what could be a more attractive thing than that kind of sendoff. >> reporter: but his past hasn't been perfect. he was set to make $150,000 for teaching students three hours a week. >> my initial reaction was outrageous. >> reporter: the doctor says most would get $3,000 for teaching that seminar, and the school's mission is to provide an affordable session. >> once again, it's how he is quick on his feet. i would say before the ink was dry on that first story there was no story. >> reporte
into the public sector as well. good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum in "america's newsroom." gregg: i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. obamacare provides many employers to provide coverage to anyone who works at least 30 hours a week. but to get around that, some employers are just cutting back on the hours this report coming just days after ups announced it will not provide coverage to husbands and wives of employees who can get insurance on their own. martha: ups is not alone in this. many employers fear they will not be able to afford it. some saying they still don't know what's in the law. this is years after it was signed into law and nancy pelosi famously said this. >> we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it away from the fog of the controversy. martha: the truth is, we are still finding out what's in it, stuart. companies are still scratching their heads saying we're not really sure how this will affect us and what it will cost us. stuart is the host of "varney & company" on the fox business network. what do you make of this latest news? >> it is chan
. >>peter: no one knows more about corporate america than you. you said this is akin to what in terms of corporations? >> the turn around specialist. >>peter: when those turn-around guys come in, don't they have targs -- targets? don't they say your contract is going to end unless you bring our expenses down x percent or you increase our numbers up this way? >> i don't know whether that is in this guy's contract. he's got a thee-year contract. -- a three-year contract. ask yourself is it not cheaper to spend a half million dollars on a high-priced professional than going into bankruptcy. >>peter: what should we be doing on that? great question po pose today. you'll be posing other questions and giving more answers at 9:20. >> i'm free with my opinion. >>peter: they are free but they're worth a lot. how does the government plan to stop leaks at the n.s.a.? the plan to replace people with machines. really? okay. then just can't get the kid to sleep? how these interactive pajamas can change your life if you're a parent. i think it's working. good morning. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ]
contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we will delve deeper into that. what i want to give him a couple of minutes at a moderate is framing a li
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
of the united states of america" is a biography and portrait of each first lady. it is now available for the discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping and can be found at c- span.org/products. the c-span town hall meeting that discusses the future of political parties. following that, nancy pelosi. after that, a town hall meeting with senator john mccain. >> this is a c-span townhall. you good tos away, have more of your say. during congress's recess, tuesday, wednesday, and thursday night on c-span, we are looking at public politics and talking to you about positions. welcome to c-span town hall tonight. we will ask you about the future of your political party. who is the future leader, the likely presidential candidate, and maybe it is somebody that is not necessarily yet on the national scene. a couple of ways for you to participate, by phone. we will open up the lines now. make sure you mute your television and radio when you call in. you can also use twitter. we will read tweets from members of congress who are back in their home states and districts for the august recess. some p
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
of its kind in america, to enable information sharing across the austin medical community. -- austin medical community. medicalgency -- boston community. the reaction after the attack was not accidental. it was a product of years of training and investment in the link state and local capacity and the quick, orderly, focused, and comprehensive response by law enforcement, first responders, and the larger boston community on that day saved lives. immediate control over the scene by law enforcement and assistance from first responders and medical personnel helped you entry theack fallen fallen and injured, a scenario they have practiced to ensure no one facility would be overwhelmed. citizens stepped up and played a critical role, it hearing for the wounded, donating blood, and submitting videos that helped -- aify the suspects powerful reminder of the role the public lays in providing aid but also providing useful information. the reason why after i became secretary, i called for the creation and then expansion of the argument " if you see something say something" campaign, expanding i
the iraq war. pew research showing 64% of people around the world have a favorable view of america. 64%. so that's a 13-point rise among those same countries when they were last vared back in '07. still in muslim countries like pakistan, frustration over u.s. foreign policy appearing to have only deepened 11%. there's been a dip in approval under president obama. >> leigh, you think that's just obama's transition to presidency over bush? because that last poll was in 2007 and what else would it say? >> i think that has a lot to do with it. i think the world is looking to us for a number of reasons. you know, but i think that it's, you know, i think the timing has a lot to do with it. that was a long time ago. i think under president obama i think our global image has improved. >> joe, you can't forget how unpopular we were at the end of the bush presidency, right? >> no doubt about it. i mean, things were going poorly. of course, we're still having some problems in the middle east but across the rest of the world, across europe, those numbers are certainly up. you know, ed rendell, we've be
is it all of a sudden america's fault? and i couldn't agree more with the previous callers that say we should not give any more money to any nation that behaves this way. detroit is bankrupt. sacramento, california, is bankrupt. we have huge, huge problems over here as far as infrastructure. i think we should take care of our own. i'm a first generation american and i can tell you, these countries, we give money -- they don't share our values, they don't share our beliefs, they don't have the same respect for human life that we do. we have absolutely no business giving them our money. i thank you very much. hubie: thank you, shane. from maryland. our next caller from ports myth, howe. good morning. caller: good morning. i enjoy your program here. just a quick comment about what's going on in egypt. people don't realize that they it -- america a pretty much put the president there before, and they lived under, generally, what america -- with freedom. now they have this muslim brotherhood guy who came in here and tried to slowly bring back shari'a law to this country. they'll people are
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
for us and america directly at 48th and 6th in our summer concert series. here we are mid august. when they start playing, they're going to have to tell everyone at the lincoln and midtown tunnel to turn around. there's going to be no room in the city. >> they are the power of power. they dominate the city. >> those horns, can't way. and there as barbecue, too. >> come on down and play us with on the astroturf. can they play in the city? yes. can they play on turf? we'll find out. the tower of power never stops playing, never stops touring. 20 guys on that stage. i didn't it was possible. we'll find out. >> just now? >> i've been with you for an hour and two minutes and now you're excited. >> a fox news alert this morning. chaos in egypt. this as the muslim brotherhood calls for a day of rage. >> while we want to sustain our relationship with egypt, our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets and rights are being rolled back. >> right now the u.s. supplies $1.3 billion in aid to egypt every year, but the president says that could
intent on doing something good when they go around violating the rights of every citizen in america. all the badrs things happening in this a administration that obama calls a hoax. i am sure the mainstream media will jump all over this, but they do not tell us anything else. you see the same headlines for 10 days in a row on the computer. host: thank you for the call. this is a story from " washington times" web site. unnamed u.s. officials told media outlets that intelligence agencies in yemen alerted washington to the threats as the yemeni president came to the u.s. to meet members of congress last thursday." michael is joining us next from philadelphia, democratic line, good morning. caller: thank you for covering this important topic. i was wondering if you have any insight or sources that revealed why it is such a general area being covered as opposed to, say, 36 -- 3 specific countries? that is one question. the other is a common about how unstable these places are these days. pakistan has never been stable in recent memory. a contributing factor. of course then there is the bengh
threat that i've seen in the last several years. >>gretchen: should america take a stand or shut down? joining us is fox news middle eastern terrorist expert. what do you make of this? i know it would take more than an idle threat to close this many embassies. >> i do. what we know is al qaeda from yemen and other spots have threatened individuals will blow up inside the embassy. we're not talking about an all-out attack from the outside by thousands of people, hundreds of people. in this case the best position would have been to say we're not receiving visitors and we are taking measures and also ask the armies and the security forces of these countries to create a perimeter of protection. the reason i'm saying this short of knowing very specifically what time and who and what manner they're going to attack the embassy, if we don't have this information, we don't have it. that's why we shut down 22 of those. this would be the best course. the reason is this is sending a message to al qaeda and the other jihaddists they are winning. even if they don't attack they will get videos and m
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
the face of gun violence in america as horrific as sandy hook was is not some suburban kid, it's a brown or black kid in the ghetto. if you look at chicago, chicago's on track for two sandy hooks per month. usually against another black person. yet chicago is about a third, a third and a third black, white and hispanic. why would so many murders come from the black community? the answer is so many kids come from parents without fathers. you look at violation, we're talking about gang-related kids, usually young kids. there was a documentary that my dad and i discussed in the book called resurrection, and it was about truth pack shakur. tupac shakur. and he said white people may like hearing me say this, but i know for a fact if i'd had a father in my life, i would have had discipline and confidence. and he went on to talk about the facth joid a did a father, he wanted structure, he wanted protection. and he went on to say in a way maybe a conservative right-winger might say that it is important for a boy to have a father in his life. a boy needs a father. tupac shakur said this. there's
. for those of you who don't know, max boot is one of america's leading historians in military history, and one of our best historical writers. he is presently in the kilpatrick senior fellow for national security studies at the council on foreign relations. he continues to write extensively in "the weekly standard," the "los angeles times." is a record contributor to "the new york times," "the wall street journal." he's been an editor and a journalist for "the wall street journal" for "christian science monitor." he has written two other major books in the past that are of interest to me, then 17 -- "the savage wars of peace" and "war made new: technology, warfare, and the course of history 1500 to today." max tends to write really big bucks. -- big books. this morning he will talk to us about his latest, "invisible armies." max, turn it over to you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that warm and generous introduction. thank you also for your many decades of service. i see a lot of folks here who are either current active duty or retired military, and i think all of you for your
america shouldn't pay its bills that are already run up. that we should shut down government, if they can't shut down obama care. >> reporter: talking college affordability does get young people excited. and today in buffalo, the president unveiled a plan to set up a ranking system for universities that will tie financial aid to how well they're doing on tuition costs and others. the republican chairman praised the president for pushing competition, although klein added i remain concerned that p proposing a college ranking system could curtail the price controls. so with little chance of it passing congress, the president is likely to use executive power, a strategy he has already deployed on a range of other issues. brett? >> ed henry, traveling in syracuse. well, what do you think on the president's plan of ranking colleges, and what do you think of his bus trip? let me know on twitter, you can follow me @brettbaier. >>> at least 17 women are accusing the democrat of making unwanted advances or inappropriate statements. we expect to have more tomorrow and will have a complete report on
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
, sarah, here at "fox & friends," and america does too. a great family and great story. >>brian: if she's making this type of progress, she'll be back in school in september? >>peter: i'm not sure. she's had a tough road. she fought back five different times and she will flourish. >>brian: six minutes after the top of the hour. obamacare is in the midst of another delay. even though it was posted on the labor department since february, another delay. you know what the president said when he passed obamacare? because you have a catastrophic disease you shouldn't go bankrupt, that means you have to limit out-of-pocket expenses, $6,000 per person, 12,000 per family. now they say insurance can't handle that, finances don't add up so they're allowing them another year to get their house in order and another delay for obamacare. even according to one senior administration official the delays have been a disaster. >>gretchen: insurance have had three years to upgrade their computer systems. that is the excuse being given now, they simply don't have their computer systems ready to handle it. i
forcing -- there is an organizing i'm advising calling the compact for america trying to get a balanced budget amendment and get a convention call a nifty idea to control a run away convention. there are policy innovations that states are trying to put together, again, across a host of areas left, right, which is trying to reassert the original dynamic. not nullify. states cannot say federal law is no good. just to rebalance the power in the country. host: ian, can you speak to federal effort pushing back? if that's the way right to look at this. what is or what can the federal government do once states put these efforts into place? guest: if we are talking about an actual nullification law, that's when the state tries to forbid the federal government from forcing its own law, those laws are void almost automatically. guest: john c. calhoun is probably roaming the studios right now. guest: the federal official would try to enforce the law, presumably the state would try to stop them. and then it would be very easy for the federal government to get a court order to say that the state can
with george zimmerman and trayvon martin. others say if you want to get to the problems in america, look to the inner cities where black on black crime is through the roof. especially chicago, that is where crime is through the roof. a local lawmakers there, a state lawmaker there thinks she has a theory on who is killing these kids. state rep monique davis. listen to her. >> i'm going to tell you what some suspicions have been and people have whispered to me, they're not sure that black people are shooting all of these children. there's some suspicion -- and i don't want to spread this but i want to tell you what i've been hearing. they suspect maybe the police are killing some of these kids. >>ainsley: she's hearing these rumors on the street. >>steve: and repeating them on that detroit radio station. bill o'reilly booked her last night. it was fiery. watch. >> chicago police, as you well know, are not gunning down black children. you know that; right? >> well, certainly they are not, bill. but based upon the history of african-americans in this country and based upon the fact that 70%
be with again. >> thanks for joining us america lives starts right now. nstarting with a fox news alert. dozens of employees have been air lifted in yemen. there was a decision to evacuate and growing concerns over extremely high security threat level. welcome everyone to america live. i am jamie colby. >> and i am gregg jarret. we are in for megyn kelliy. the state department is urging all american citizens to get out and leave the country. intelligence officials have increased chatter about an imminent attack in and around the araban peninsula where a dangerous al-qaeda have set up shop. the british government also shut down their own embassy in yemen followed six days of increased u.s. drone strikes due to the threat that prompted the closure of 19 u.s. embassy and consulates in the middle east and africa. wendall joins us. >> the latest drone strike occurred when four suspected members of al-qaeda were killed in the car they were riding in. shortly after that attack the state department announced the u.s. embassy was evacuated and appears more than nonessential personnel was f
to america's pass time. all that and a story you might not believe. a california surfer who is living large thanks to food stamps funded by you. i'm shannon bream. america's news headquarters live starts from the nation's capitol right now. >>> we begin with the very latest on hannah anderson, the california teen who went missing last week after the bodies of her mother and brother were discovered in a burning home. hannah was found alive and reportedly physically unharmed with her alleged kidnapper in the idaho wilderness. will carr is in cascade, idaho with the very latest on the case. hi, will. >> reporter: hi, shannon. i want to set the scene for you. i'm about five or six miles away from where hannah was rescued yesterday. throughout this entire process, authorities have said that it was their top priority to make sure that hannah could return home safe and sound. now, yesterday she was flown to boise, a hospital in boise which is about 70 miles from where we are now. she was being evaluated. we're told that she's in pretty good shape, if you can believe that, and she's set to be reuni
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
as the american people are concerned there is only one way america's greatness will be restored again for americans and made to feel good and that is to have strict term limits for congress. both parties in congress kill america's greatness and the only ways to have single term limits for them. dagen: good to see you, thank you so much, passionate as always. maybe a jolt for the bowls, that is what chevy is hoping. general motors cutting the price tag on the 2014 model of the electric car by $5,000 comes in now, sticker price for the 2014 model just under $35,000, factory in the full government tax credit and the final tally could be as low as $27,000 and you get some state tax credits depending on where you live. gold sales did fall 3% last month but they are a 9% so far this year. the price could help clear the way for the company's new cadillac e l r which will be based on the same technology. if you don't like the chevy volt trimmings you can get yourself another one. gm stock is down 2%. the price of the chevy volt not the only thing taking ed did. u.s. trade gap in june hitting
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
in the way that urban america is perceived is too big of a story to ignore. >> where the american dream is moving. sunday night at 9:00. >> public affairs event from washington directly to you. putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house of vince, briefings and conferences. offering gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house as a public service of private industry. created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago, and funded by your local travel -- cable or satellite provider. >> ease into a first ladies, influence and image, against monday, september 9 -- all this month we are showing episodes from season one. watch it each weeknight. next, the life of james madison's wife, dolly madison. madison. ♪ >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got th
in the united states. good evening and welcome to c-span's continuing series on america's first ladies. tonight, you will learn about lucy webb hayes. the wife of rutherford the hayes. here to start us off is a first ladies historian and author of a collection of biographies. welcome. in 1876, the country is joyously celebrating the 100th centennial of the declaration of independence and it is an election year. the election is greatly contested with no clear victor. tell us about the atmosphere with which it was at the white house. what was it like? >> susan, it is pretty schizophrenic, to tell you the truth. we had just come out of the centennial celebration. they were coming to the white house, but they do not know if they will move into the white house. the election is not yet decided. what happened is samuel and rutherford b. hayes were in one of the closest elections in the united states at that point. and tilden wins the popular vote. there are three states that are so tight, the parties are tackling each other. the republicans said, we won. the democrats said, no, we won. hayes goes to b
in america. we'll tell you where and why and why some are saying not so fast. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know some owls aren't that wise? don't forget i'm having brunch with meghan tomorrow. who? meghan, my coworker. who? seriously? you've met her like three times. who? (sighs) geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. all your imptant legal matters in just minutes. protect youramily... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and i don't know.eams. how did you get here? [ speaking in russian ] look, look, look... you probably want to get away as much as we do. with priceline express deals, you can get a fabulous hotel without bidding. think of the rubles you'll save. with one touch, fun in the sun. i like fun. well, that went exactly i as planned.. really? so it was no surprise when he set out to give the world the hardest-working, best-smelling cleaners he could. like mr. clean with the scent of gain. that combines irresistible scent and powerful cleaning. and his lemon-scente
driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. right now, get a 2013 chevrolet volt for around $269 per month. hihing, helicopters buzzing, and truck engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&"that starts with one ofess. the world's most advancedy," distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when
does the program under the prior statute to protect america act look at this exact mechanism of targeting persons overseas and held it against the constitutional challenge. that's why it hasn't been reported a very much but that is an opinion of the court review, arbuckle three that have looked at the program and said that it is unlawful. it's hard for me to imagine an oversight regime that would exceed that. the problem -- >> i don't think you are using that -- >> you have to look at the core to -- court. we were prosecutors and seat to get a first warrant. you go to the judge and present the facts and i am not aware of any country in the world that has anything like the court so you could make it adversarial and slow it down and rest. the problem i think is there's a lack of confidence. it is somewhere below headlights and above right now. >> it's hard for us because in the community we depend on the relationship with the intelligence committee to provide the legitimacy that we need in the program to carry them forward. >> where is the abuse? ayaan understand some people th
to extend your driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. right now, get a 2013 chevrolet volt for around $269 per month. i'm bethand i'm michelle. and we own the paper cottage. it's a stationery and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> despite the slow economic recovery, gallup has found that only about a third of american adults prepare a household budget. some economic analysts say that could be making many of us less financially secure and in a way, less free. tom foreman has this week's "american journey." >> four slices. >> reporter: grabbing a pizza on the run is a treat ellen and joe wong enjoy. even with modest
, the central social problem in america. >> host: next call for mr. elder, we have about seven minutes left in our program. dennis in sharon, massachusetts. hi, dennis. dennis? >> caller: yes. can you hear me? yes -- >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: okay, great. i'm a great fan of c-span. i watch booktv every weekend. my father was born in 1892, i was his first son. when i was born, he was in 60 years old. he left macon, georgia, as he told we because he saw a black man being burned in the fountain of downtown macon, georgia. the point i would like to make is that i really believe it's, obviously, the father being in the household is a tremendous service to the children, without a doubt. but most importantly i really believe this thing about mind power. having the focus in order to be able to have a discipline to achieve what your goals are in life. the other thing i want to say is that there's a psychological underpinning that i believe hardly anybody talks about in which people aspire to be the anti-antihero. so a lot of this outburst that we see is really someone who really believes
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)